ou may have already seen this time-loop thriller… CHRISTOPHER STEVENS reviews last night’s television

The Lazarus Project

Evaluation:

Derry Red: Jamie-Lee O’Donnell

Evaluation:

Time does not repeat itself. Deja vu is not real. It’s like that, because of all the time-loop drama on TV this year.

The Lazarus Project (Sky Max) takes the concept that was so movingly explored in BBC2’s Life After Life and turns it into a hackneyed sci-fi thriller.

There’s a romantic subplot too, though it’s not half as clever as The Time Traveler’s Wife on Sky Atlantic…and less sharp and shocking than Russian Doll on Netflix.

Like a substandard episode of Doctor Who, half the series consists of characters staring urgently at computer screens or standing next to unspecified bits of futuristic machinery, frantically explaining the plot to each other. .

Like a substandard episode of Doctor Who, half the series consists of characters staring urgently at computer screens or standing next to unspecified bits of futuristic machinery, frantically explaining the plot to each other. .

The Lazarus Project (Sky Max) takes the concept that was so movingly explored in BBC2’s Life After Life and turns it into a hackneyed sci-fi thriller.

Paapa Essiedu plays George, a software whiz who is dismayed to realize he is reliving the last months of his life. A sarcastic special agent named Archie (Anjli Mohindra) stops him in the street and explains what is happening to him: “Don’t take this the wrong way, she says, but you’re a mutant.

Showing George around his HQ, Archie educates him. “We are a top-secret, multinational organization dedicated to preventing and reversing mass extinction events through diplomatic, scientific or militaristic means,” she says, speaking at a speed usually reserved for the terms and conditions of advertisements on credit cards.

Archie’s boss, Wes (Caroline Quentin), explains more succinctly that his agents have saved the world about 20 times since nuclear holocaust was first prevented in 1963. They have a machine that resets time, sending the planet back to the Previous July 1, to help humanity avoid mistakes. Wes speaks entirely in clichés. . . but then, if you had lived 20 times, everything would seem cliché to you.

Like a substandard episode of Doctor Who, half the series consists of characters staring urgently at computer screens or standing next to unspecified bits of futuristic machinery, frantically explaining the plot to each other. .

Paapa Essiedu plays George, a software whiz who is dismayed to realize he is reliving the last months of his life

The twists are so glaring and unsurprising that The Lazarus Project is almost like watching a rehearsal – the worst kind of time travel. It built on an action sequence, with a chase between an RV and a motorcycle that was so silly it became entertaining.

George discovered he was a sniper with a gun by leaning out of a high-speed vehicle. Maybe in a past life he played a cop in a 1970s American comedy like The Dukes Of Hazzard. Yee-haw, get those good old boys, George!

As the world ended and Wes pressed the restart button again, we saw the face of a rogue Lazarus agent with a genocidal grudge. He looked a lot like Tom Burke, from BBC1’s The Musketeers and Strike. This makes the second episode worth watching.

Actress Jamie-Lee O’Donnell, who plays Michelle in Derry Girls on C4, traveled back in time on The Real Derry (C4) to explore how the Troubles divided the city and how it is healing. She started with a catchy phrase: “This town is so good they named it twice.” Catholics call it Derry, Protestants call it Londonderry.

Actress Jamie-Lee O¿Donnell, who plays Michelle in Derry Girls on C4, traveled back in time on The Real Derry (C4) to explore how the Troubles divided the city,

Actress Jamie-Lee O’Donnell, who plays Michelle in Derry Girls on C4, traveled back in time on The Real Derry (C4) to explore how the Troubles divided the city,

Then she went for a pint with her Derry Girls co-star Saoirse-Monica Jackson, and the hour was bristling with banter. But it takes a nimble presenter to navigate through such sensitive terrain, and O’Donnell turned out to be flat-footed.

Attempting to cross the sectarian divide, she blundered into a Protestant bagpipe rehearsal. “I thought I was going to walk in and catch flames,” she joked, before asking a rude question about the Bloody Sunday anniversary that engulfed the room in shuddering silence.

“This city is still held hostage by its complicated history,” she concluded. It was a clumsy and insane observation, made worse by the fact that the Derry Girls so neatly mirrored The Troubles without ever making politics the focus.

About Hannah Schaeffer

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