UW Planetarium Reopens With Halloween-Themed Show, Full November Lineup | New

October 26, 2022

The famous Eagle Nebula, or Messier 16, is a young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens. Here it is seen through the James Webb Space Telescope. The Eagle Nebula, along with other stars, will be discussed on the “Stellar Graveyard” show Friday, November 11 at 8 p.m. at the Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium at the University of Wyoming. (Photo by UW Planetarium)

After being closed since August 9 due to electrical damage to its theater equipment, the Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium at the University of Wyoming is now fully operational and will soon resume its regular monthly programming schedule.

“We regret that repairs to the planetarium following the Laramie flood in August took so long,” said Max Gilbraith, planetarium coordinator. “Fortunately, we are back and ready to reopen our doors to the public. Our first paid program will be Halloween night for a special “Dark Side of the Moon” musical performance. Bring some disguises and we’ll have candy for the pranksters.

The November schedule will resume with the planetarium’s normal lineup of Tuesday night “Wyoming Skies” constellation programs; Live scientific presentations on Friday evening; family planetarium movies on Saturday afternoons; and Saturday night music shows, says Gilbraith. “Hotter Than the Sun,” a new program in the planetarium catalog, will look at the history of atomic energy and weapons.

For tickets or to receive more program information, email [email protected] or leave a voicemail message and a callback phone number at (307) 766-6506. Tickets are $5 for the public and $3 for students, seniors, veterans, first responders, and under 18s. Places are free for children under 5 years old.

Reservations or pre-purchases are not required and walk-ins are welcome. Tickets can be purchased online with a credit card, reserved by email or voicemail, or purchased at the start of the show. Cash or check is accepted at the door. The planetarium, which can accommodate 58 people, is located in the basement of the Physical Sciences Pavilion. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis outside of ADA/wheelchair designated seating.

To pay for tickets with a credit card, go to https://www.uwyo.edu/uwplanetarium/ticket.aspx. For a group larger than six, email the planetarium for a private show at https://uwyo.sjc1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKuqIynOn7gFK2F. Tickets for private shows are the same as for public programs.

A film and a special live lecture for the public will be presented each week. All programs last approximately one hour. If time permits, part of the show may also focus on a live sky tour or additional information related to the subject of the film.

The Halloween program is:

— Monday, October 31, 8 p.m.: “Dark Side of the Moon”. This special Halloween night presentation of the planetarium’s Liquid Sky musical series will feature Pink Floyd’s 1973 album, “Dark Side of the Moon.” The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

The November schedule is as follows:

— Tuesday, November 1, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, November 4, 8 p.m.: “Hotter than the Sun: The Atomic Age”. Physicists and astrophysicists were liberated to develop nuclear weapons and energy in the first half of the 20th century. The program will go beyond the headlines of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the Cuban Missile Crisis; and the disasters at the nuclear power plants at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. This program explores the history of nuclear weapons testing, electricity generation, and the modern risks and benefits of technology that harnesses or releases energy hotter than the sun.

— Saturday, November 5, 2 p.m.: “The Dawn of the Space Age”, a full-dome film. The program explores the launch of the first artificial satellite, Sputnik, the magnificent lunar landings and private spaceflight.

— Saturday, November 5, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Psychedelic Indie Rock,” a music-based light show. The program will feature a personalized playlist of “out of this world” music from artists such as Tame Impala, MGMT, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, STRFKR and many more in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Friday, November 11, 8 p.m.: “Star Cemetery”. This program explores the science behind star formation; the various forms they take; and the stellar graveyard, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.

— Saturday, November 12, 2 p.m.: “The hot and energetic universe”, a full-dome film. This film studies the achievements of modern astronomy; the most advanced terrestrial and orbital observatories; the basic principles of electromagnetic radiation; and natural phenomena related to high energy astrophysics.

— Saturday, November 12, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Progressive Metal,” a music-based light show. The program will include a personalized playlist of hard-hitting and technical music from artists such as Gojira, Mastodon, Opeth, Periphery, Baroness and more in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Tuesday, November 15, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, November 18, 8 p.m.: “Aurorae: Dancing Lights”. The program will discuss what causes the Northern Lights in the sky, where they occur, and whether other planets have auroras.

— Saturday, November 19, 2 p.m.: “The Sun: Our Living Star”, a full-dome film. The sun consumes 600 million tons of hydrogen per second and is 500 times more massive than all the planets combined. Viewers will uncover the secrets of the sun and experience never-before-seen footage of its violent surface in an immersive full-domed format.

— Saturday, November 19, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Retro Hits,” a music-based light show. The program will include a personalized playlist of nostalgic 80s music in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Nov. 21-27: Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday.

— Tuesday, November 29, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

For a more detailed description of these programs, go to www.uwyo.edu/physics/planetarium/schedule.html.

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